Friday, January 16, 2009

How Much Can A Dog Know About Advertising?

There's an urban myth about a Creative Director who would critique students' books with a glove puppet.


Semi-legendary portfolio critiquer


"Sooty likes this one," he would say, or "Oh dear, Sooty says he thinks he's seen that idea before."

This never happened to me. But I did once get a crit from a dog.

It was at Lowe in about 1994. My partner and I went to see a senior creative one afternoon... I'm not saying he'd been drinking, but he did smell of alcohol, shambled unsteadily around his office, and slurred his speech in the manner of someone who had been drinking. So if he wasn't drunk, he was a fine impressionist.

Anyway, after first telling us in a sinisterly over-effusive manner that our book was "completely brilliant" and that instead of looking for a placement, "you should go straight to setting up your own agency", he then proceeded to show our book to his dog.

Sadly, his dog was not so keen. "Oh dear," the senior creative informed us. "[Dog's name] doesn't like this campaign. Or this one. Sorry lads. I'm not going to be able to pass it on to our CD after all."

Well you know what? That dog didn't know shit. Because that exact same book got me a job at Saatchis a few weeks later.

So, that's the worst crit I ever had. What was yours?

74 comments:

m denton esq said...

Of course the sooty CD was Ron Collins (Damon's Dad).
He once expressed an interest in a piece of creative work that I did whilst languishing at the bottom of the heap at Leo Burnett in the late 70's
....but because he had such a fearsome reputation, I was too scared to go across to WCRS and show him my portfolio.

Anonymous said...

We were asked on a crit what university we studied at?
The reply obviously wasn't right and the CD said "there is a perfectly good course at Bucks you know"
All this was before he even opened our portfolio.

DC said...

I went to see Tony Brignall at his house once. He did a lot of tutting and head shaking as he flicked through my book. He then spent 30 mins talking about himself. Closed our book and handed it back to us. Then he said, I'd normally suggest you come back in a few weeks to see me. But I don't think that will give you enough time to completely redo your book.

Anonymous said...

We left our book for Graham Fink once. A few days later his PA called us to say he'd like to meet us. To cut a long story short, after waiting for him for a couple of hours, we got to see him and all he said was 'I didn't like your book. I thought it was boring'.

john w. said...

Do you know what became of the dog?

]-[appy Thought said...

As a university group we went to see Dave Trott for the third time in a series of tutorials in London. I guess he felt we hadn't improved over the week as he laid into the entire class after we put our work on the wall. We were told we had no love for advertising, that none of us would amount to anything and that we should all give up and find jobs in fast food outlets. Work was pulled off the walls and some thrown out the window, I don't think I've ever seen anyone so angry. He told us he'd prioritised looking at our work to helping to going home and helping his daughter with her maths homework, which poured a nice heap of salt into our wounds...

What was even more embarrassing is that we'd all bought him a bottle of wine to say thanks for his time over the past month. We just left it there with a bow round it, picked up our bags and left.

Although one of the worst crits ever, I guess it was kind of inspiring to produce better work so that never happened again!

Wal said...

Right out of uni I had a chance to put my book under Tony Davidson's nose. He opened it, liked the first campaign and wrote my name down. He then looked through the rest, gave me an empty look and just walked away without a word...

Scamp, it would be awesome to see your student book from 94!

Scamp said...

John, I heard the dog died. So no more book crits for him.

Wal, we used to show our student book to young teams, as an example of what one should look like. But after a while the student books started becoming better than ours was, so we had to stop doing that...

Anonymous said...

I don't know about Mr Patch not knowing shit. he was on the d&ad jury one year - there's a pic of him in the annual.

Anonymous said...

I had a similar drunken crit over at CDP. I forget the name of the fella we saw, who could barely see us let alone our work. He took to flicking the pages over using only his foot, as he didn't have the ability to move forwards in his chair without falling flat on his alcho nose.

Needless to say, we didn't go back there. I saw him years later in the sports bar in london, where I was shocked to discover he was a Leeds fan. He was singing and rolling around in the beer on the floor.

Anonymous said...

We went to see [no names, please, if you're going to slag them off] at Fallon. [They no longer work there - Scamp]They proceeded to give us the most despondent and unconstructive crit we'd ever had. The best part was we were forced to present our book standing up. Thanks guys, cheers.

Ferris said...

Ha ha! I think I know who you're talking about 6.15! I had an interesting 'experience' at Lowe with the legendary Paul Weinberger. After getting recommended to him by a team there, he looked through our book spending about a second on each page shouting 'shock tactic, shock tactic, shock tactic, shock tactic, shock tactic, shock tactic, shock tactic...' He then slammed the book shut and pointed to an old Heineken ad on the wall of his office and said 'I want you boys to charm me.'

AP of CRAP said...

Went to a team at Saatchi's with our 2nd ever book. We knew it was rubbish as we'd been to earlier crits in the day. Her partner was away but looked through the book, laughed at nearly everything and said we should definitely show this to someone higher up regarding a placement asap. Safely I can say, if we had arranged a crit with any of the CDs, we may have never stepped foot in the door again through embarrassment.

I'm sure scamp saw the same book as this team and said the very opposite. Not saying that you weren't constructive, you just weren't ready to give us a placement!

Anonymous said...

Good old Shabby!

Anonymous said...

Saw Graham Fink in the early nineties. He didn't seem impressed by our book. "What else are you interested in, besides advertising?" he asked. "Er.. Music?". "Why don't you do that, then?"

Anonymous said...

i once had a famous New York CD set fire to one of my ads and throw the flaming thing out the window. Ah yes, good times. he was right though.

neil christie said...

Here's the account handling equivalent.
I went for an interview at Lowe in the early 90s. The 'chap' who interviewed me told me, "You'll have a shit time here. You'll be a bag carrier. No-one will care what you think. No-one will listen to what you say. The creative directors will shit on you. The creative juniors will shit on you. If you don't sell their work first time they'll humiliate you and send you back to do it again. You'll be the lowest of the low in the food chain. You'll hate it. But if you can survive you'll be able to put on your CV that you worked at Lowe."
I thought, 'Bollocks to that, you arrogant tossers' and took the job I was lucky enough to be offered at BBH.

Anonymous said...

I'm sure everyone has had both good crits; positive, impressed, eager to see more and left feeling enthused and bad crits; dissapointed with the work, most campaigns need reviewing but still left feeling enthused. Good or bad crits are subjective and either can be helpful from one day to the next. A truly bad crit though is one in which there is nothing to be gained. A team at CHI recently took quite along time to flick through our book, umming and ahhing as they went. They got to the last campaign in the book and the usual 'going back through with verdicts' ensued, only, there were no verdicts. It was as though we'd set them the impossible challenge of.. having an opinion.

Stu said...

Had a great crit with Graham Fink. Went in and had a chat, looked at my book told me to start again and then talked to me about Joy Division for an hour. Really inspiring and he was right about started the book again, really nice guy, contrary to other reports.

john w. said...

I heard he came up with some decent roughs.

Anonymous said...

Your crit was from [nickname] at Lowe, scamp. The legendary [bloke's name]. And if you saw him after lunch, he probably had had a few sherbets. It's like petrol for him.

Scamp said...

Yeah, I know who he is, but I don't think it's really fair to out him as an alcoholic. I mean... what if he knows how to use a computer?

Rob Mortimer said...

My worst interview (acc man) was at M+C Saatchi where the guy was interviewing two of us at the same time and proceeded to take absolutely no interest and pay no attention whatsoever to what we said.

I spoke to another guy who seemed pretty decent but I'd already been put off.

Anca said...

Neil, excellent attitude!
(Even though some say I’m an arrogant whenever I encourage
acting the way you did.)
There’s a huge difference
between education through criticism
and education through humiliation.
And the huge difference
is that the second doesn’t exist,
at least not under a heading like Education.
It can at most be a good source of frustration.
And the problem with frustration
is that it somehow tends to be passed on
to the younger generation
by means of “inheritance”.
And I think that was what you were offered,
the opportunity to perpetuate their frustrations.

john w. said...

The dog did some decent roughs

…I'll get my coat.

If This Is A Blog Then What's Christmas said...

David Abbott recalls one interview he attended. Clutching a small folio of trade ads, he was sitting in a rather low chair in front of a man who continued writing for several minutes before raising his head in Abbott's direction. He then asked Abbott, 'Is there anything you desperately want to show me?' The insensitivity and pomposity of this individual made Abbott vow that if he ever found himself in a position of power he would always treat people with dignity and respect.

robin said...

I was in London in the 90s for a job.
Let me share my good interviews first.
David Abbott was great. Even though he ran the UK's largest, he had time to look at my work and gave me great advice. (Unfortunately, my lack of skills has meant I been retrenched twice.)
Alan Page of Harai Page/Yellowhammer. I was walking by his ageny and dropped in, without an appointment, asking if he could see me. (I always carried my book with me.) He agreed.
John Salmon kept his word and reviewed my book even though CDP had just lost a big client hours before.
My worst crit was at WCRS. I told the team (who had just won big at some award)I was from Singapore.
Answer: "Oh don't know where that is and that we have an office there."
Then merrily ripped everything apart.
Paul Delaney and Paul Grubb were helpful.
The KHBB CDs were drunk and we never met - they had told me to go on a Saturday.

George Parker said...

I once had a client (in the US) who kept an SS Dagger on his desk. If he didn't like the ad, he would spit on it, stab it with the dagger, then throw it on the floor and jump up and down on it. He also had a huge red nose and looked like a pig. He was a douchenozzle. It's been downhill ever since.
Cheers/George

Anonymous said...

my worst (acc man) was with current head of new biz @ [name of agency censored] what a cock. talked about himself for 30 mins before giving me a minute to convey something, anything...and then going onto rubbish everywhere else I'd intervied. Arrogant full of shit twat. Did give me a beer though.

Anonymous said...

An Account man once told me how many years ago he went into see Mark Wnek when he was at Ogilvy and Mather. He had a huge and very long office. It was completely black, black walls, black furniture and black carpet. Right at the end of the dark office was a black suited, black glasses wearing Wnek, sat at a black desk writing. The Account man walked slowly towards Mark with some work in his hands that the account team had a problem with. Nervously he finally said, 'Sorry to bother you Mark, but is now a good time to have a chat about this work'. Mark apparently carried on writing for a while then finally looked up, peered over his glasses and said 'go away little boy'.

Anonymous said...

you can't really behave like this anymore i don't think and although the industry has become less anarchic and rock and roll and I think the work has suffered because of it, it's probably a good thing on balance.

there are some senior creatives who are still around who were complete arseholes when i was doing the rounds many years ago, but they seem to be behaving themselves these days. people just won't work with people who are like that anymore.

Benjamin said...

My worst interview was not in London.
I went to see a guy who started his own agency. He wanted to interview at his home.
He fancied his house to be some recording studio. Went on quite a bit about his musical accomplishments.
Then went on talking about himself for another 30 minutes.
Before finally wanting to see my book, he asked for my O and A level certs.
Told me this was essential.
Of course I didn't have them with me.
When it came to pay, I told him what I was on, which was pretty industry standard.
He asked, "is that a month or a year?"
Clueless guy.
Rumours were that he had CCTVs is his agency. And if you were seen looking out the window, he would shout at you over the PA system.
Very Luft-stalag.
Good thing his agency closed a few years ago.

Anonymous said...

thought u might like this blog too

http://www.allthatisallthatwas.blogspot.com/

Scamp said...

You thought wrong.

Anonymous said...

Don't know if it counts as a crit, but a many years ago a client had a heart attack and subsequently died on being exposed to some of my work in a presentation...

George Parker said...

I did think the death by presentation comment was pretty good. But being an old fart, I have to top all you young wankers. Long before you were all born, I first went to America and managed to con an interview with David Ogilvy. Hew was very gracious and gave me twenty minutes. At the end, I asked him what I should ask for as salary if someone was dumb enough to offer me a job. He puffed on his enormous, evil smelling pipe, looked at me and said... "Dear boy, I never discuss money. I employ people who discuss money. You'll have to ask them!" End of interview. Next met him 25 years later... Surprisingly, he had no idea who I was... Wanker.
Cheers/George

If This Is A Blog Then What's Christmas said...

That blog recommendation was hilarious. I loved the poem 'Emptiness':

the waiting day
and the changing night
it rained today
but you were nowhere in sight
think of me like u never do
than i might try to remember you

I've retitled it 'fuck punctuation, spelling, scansion, rhythm, insight, truth, metre, originality and anything else usually involved in decent poetry'.

john w. said...

Cautious tales gives pause for thought?

Anonymous said...

my worst london crit cam from dave at karmarama. kept me waiting in a corner for ages while standing right in front of me chatting idly with some female employee and then flipped through my book, closed it and told me about his own great work. I got no input, no opinion, no nothing. it was a complete waste of time.

it seems to me people are mostly nice these days. I, too have had ads light up and ripped from walls back in art school. that's almost a cliche at this point.

Anonymous said...

Had a really useless crit with a JWT creative (at one of those speed dating things) one time last year. Didn't say anything constructive that we could use to our advantage in any way which is a pity cos even bad criticism can help weed out crap work. Also been to see Graham Fink for a bad crit, but I think the key with him is that he has been there and done it regarding seeing work so you need to show him something fresh.

Anonymous said...

I had a book crit from Dave at Karmarama and it was the complete opposite, he even said we should try and go somewhere better. So we did.

Anonymous said...

The worst one we had was at CHI. We met a guy who loved the book and wanted to show his CD. He asked us to leave the book and he'd show it to his partner. We got a phone call a week later to go and meet them both. His partner hated the book and they ended up arguing with each other while we were sat there. They asked us to write another book in a week and come back and see them. So we did. Again, they argued. They asked us to go away and write another one. We did, but went to see another team somewhere else instead.

Anonymous said...

I showed my book to a couple of guys at Lowe a fair while back. They were in a messy, dark room with one desk lamp as a light source. They dropped my open folio on the floor, and proceeded to crit it from their desk, where they could not see it properly. They ordered me to turn the pages and read out the smaller headlines, for which I had to crouch on all fours on the floor to do.


Oh, and in another interview I mentioned that I had come over from Australia with my boyfriend and the CD said 'Boyfriend? You have a boyfriend? Then you're definitely not getting the job!'

robin said...

Seems nothing has changed.
When looking at books, CDs look for fresh and bold work.
Then how come so many of the same CDs/agencies produce crap?
Surely as much pressure should be applied on suits to sell the best work?
Honesty has never been big in advertising.
But shouldn't we at least try for consistency?

boot1947 said...

Back in the day, (actually, I wish I hadn't said that), I had an interview with a creative director who shall be nameless because luckily I've forgotten. His room had only him, a desk, an industrial-sized dustbin and an empty parrot cage in it. "So, what do you think of the parrot?" he asked. I double-took and then (in a frantic attempt to humour him, while checking for the exit) waxed lyrical about it being a prime example of an African Grey and asked if he had to dampen its feathers. "I'm glad you said that," he said, " because if you'd told me the cage was empty, I'd have told you to get out." His next question (common in those days) was: "What's your favourite poem?" Didn't get a job. Was relieved.

Anonymous said...

We'd been on a month's placement at Leo Burnett's several years ago. In those four weeks we made a Mac Donald's TV commercial, A 48 sheet poster campaign for Great Western Railways and most of all... We came up with a campaign for United Airlines after weeks of failed attempts by the agency to please the client (prior to our arrival). At the end of our four week stint we were left to quitely walk out the door and move on to our next placement at WCRS.

Then we got a call from Leo Burnetts. Gerrard Stamp the CD wanted to see our portfolio (he'd never asked to see it when we were there). My partner and I thought that seeing our portfolio was just going to be a formality as part of offering us a job. When we turned up to see Gerrard he flicked through our folio without taking much interest at all, said his goodbyes and that was that. We never heard from him again.

a said...

Not a crit,but a photographic brief. Called in late,one weekend. Just me and the CD. The brief was almost 100% stolen from a currently running campaign. The CD talked about himself and his genius for two hours. I left,none the wiser about the brief,pretty certain that the campaign would never run. It didn't. The CD did,though.......

Anonymous said...

Did Prince Charles used to work in advertising?

brake dollinge said...

well, there was the time that the creative director at lowe hurled our portfolio across the office of the team who'd been kind enough to put it in front of him, demanding to know what the fuck they thought it was and threatening to fire them for wasting his time. we had to pick up all the plastic sleeves off the floor and forlornly piece it back together in reception.

but my favourite is when my coat caught fire while we were getting one of those flirty sort of crits that make you think you're about to be offered a job. I'd hung it on a light that looked a BIT like a coathook. the image of me sprinting down the corridor at saatchis carrying a flaming parka must have been quite an arresting image, as it goes. I chucked it in the sink in the ladies.

didn't get the job, like.

Anonymous said...

6.10

Why did he set you up in that shit heap Lunar then?

Brownmann said...

Brilliant topic!
Our worst crit had to be one of our first in 2007. After 'acquiring' the names of a highly regarded, award-winning (we'd later find out) team at DDB we were very keen to get our book in front of them.
Sniggering and private jokes greeted every turn of the page, the experience was enough to frighten us off forever! Recently we heard the guys have now moved on, as have we. Preperation is underway for the return visit...

Anonymous said...

A few years ago I called a team to ask for a crit. They told me they'd love to see my book, but they were pitching at the moment and the only time they could see me was late a night. We arranged for me to come in at 10pm the following day. I turned up 5 minutes early, as you do, but the security guards couldn't find them anywhere. I waited till 11pm and left. When I called them the next day they told me it had been a joke.

Dean Martyn said...

I short time ago we visited a Creative Director who conducted our whole book crit on the floor in a full suit but with no shoes and socks on. (Maybe he was trying to be disruptive, we just felt embarrassed.)

http://deanmartyn.blogspot.com/

Inky Blackstuff said...

I was lucky enough to have an art director with big tits. The book was irrelevant, we always got a placement.
She was always late (birds eh?) so I inevitably got to the appointment first. They would always start looking through the book and being all pompous and serious, then when she turned up it was hilarious to sit back and watch them turn into sex-addled morons. They would forget I was there, make crap jokes, always really like our book, give us a placement, give us beer and empty their magic marker and pad draw into her handbag. Palm of her hand.

Anonymous said...

Me and my partner had a crit with a very famous foreign creative just before he became very famous.

He thought out book was 'a leetle too British'

Of course we stood up, puffed our chests out and sang the national anthem at full blast. It was like that scene in the gaol from 'Arevaderche Milwall'

But it wasn't the worst crit. That was at DDB where two rather old creatives hated our book that much, they were shouting at us at the tops of their voices. Now i can take criticism but thats a bit over the top. And their advice was shit.

Anonymous said...

This sort of stuff one would think would not be confined to the advertising business. It would also be prevalent in journalism, fiction, cartooning, movies, theater, music, technology, architecture. Alas, it is solely the province of the ad business.

Anonymous said...

Years ago I went for a book crit with John Hegarty when he was CD of TBWA.
He went through the book not making any comment till the the end when he turned to me and said, "You've got some good work and some not very good work. I question your judgement. "

I thought for a moment I would go back through the book and tell him which I thought were the crap ads. But changed my mind and, slightly humiliated I left the room.

I saw him years later and retlold the story and he was so appologetic. He needn't have been. It was a good lesson in being very selective about what you include.

Anonymous said...

I remember me and an old partner saw a team at tribal. They asked us where we'd been and if where we were going next, to which we said mother, bbh and a few others.

For some reason, they didn't like that our book had gone down well at those agencies and started looking through our book and saying it wasn't all that.

They said that they'd done the same ideas we had for EVERY campaign and that we should throw the book in the bin and start again.

Did we?

Did we fuck.

Anonymous said...

This is a brilliant topic Scamp but honestly some of these stories make me clench my fists. I think some naming and shaming would be in order. I don't really know why advertising people have such massive egos. It's always baffled me and made me feel like an outsider. Most of the worst offenders have long since faded into obscurity though...

Scamp said...

Commenters are free to name names, as long as they are writing a factual description of events and not a personal attack.

Anonymous said...

R.I.P Mr Patch.

Another great urban myth (or truth) is again a Lowe team who persuaded the young and impressionable team that the dark sunglasses wearing art director was in fact blind. The writer would describe each ad for critique and the apparently visually impaired individual would suggest moving the logo or making the headline bigger etc.

Anonymous said...

To Anon 1:23, I agree there is never a reason to be plain nasty but some of these myths and legend are what made getting out there for crits so exciting and pushed myself and I'm sure many more to do better work.

For the record worse ever experience was Nigel Rose at Euros, who after spending half the crit talking about how he did the Wonderbra Hello Boys and not someone else and how he couldn't turn down doing fag ads as it paid for his Porsche went on to berate the entire Bucks group for not doing the full list of media requirements on a Grolsch brief he had obviously just had his P.A fax over to our college the day before, girls were crying, it wasn't pretty.

Si said...

Bad crit day. Years ago went to see a CD I won’t name (only partly because I’ve forgotten it) but you’ll probably be able to work it out if you really do have nothing else to do.

Said CD was of the opinion that my book had too many pastiches in it. Probably a fair comment at the time. But tough to take from a bloke who’d just written a credit card pastiche for the D&AD call for entries ads, and a pastiche of the naked Sophie Dahl perfume poster for something else I can’t remember, and a couple of other shameless pastiches that I also can’t remember. (Did I challenge him on this? Yeah right. Fundamentally too English.)

Not remembering is a theme here, as after this less than mutually-backslapping chat I went out on the beer with a friend of mine who was then working at said CD’s agency (and is coincidentally now working at yours).

Cut to: Last tube. Midnight. Eyes roll open with the doors. Frantically stumble off, this is my stop. Phew. Hang on. No! Shit! Doors closing – make a leap for it. Too late. Too drunk. Despite endless phone calls and lunchtimes at tube lost property, never see book again. Who’d want to nick a book full of nicked ideas? Still, I’m sure some of it was brilliant. The simple elegance of those lost ideas grows yearly in my head.

Anonymous said...

I was lucky enough to have 2 interviews in the same week--one at a small place and another at a Big Agency with a well-known, head-up-his-backside CD. The Big Agency guy looked through my book, complemented some of the work, and proceeded to tell me how lucky I was to have a chance to work with him at this popular place... and did I know how many creatives would kill for the job?

In the end, I chose the small agency on the gut feeling that the place was on an upswing and I'd get to work on everything. I called the BIg Agency guy to let him know and thank him for him time, and he proceeded to laugh at me, wish me a sarcastic "good luck", and hang up while I was mid-sentence.

In the end, the small agency was indeed on the upswing and is still going strong. While the Big Agency is in free fall and what creative teams are left mostly adapt European ads. Karma, what.

Anonymous said...

Funny comments. We also had a crit with a mid-weight team from LOWE about 6 years ago. Our book was 100% scamped up but a few campaigns we had used helvetica to write the line purely so it was legible, not to prove our typography skills. The AD commented that he didn't like our typography so we explained it was for legibility only, but he continued to make the same comment every time. No comments about the ideas, just the type....NICE ONE

Anonymous said...

worse crit, a team at Saatchi who whilst we were there on placement had flicked through our book and been seemingly unimpressed, strangely after we left our road safety campaign turned up in the award annuals with their names on it...so maybe they did like it after all?

Anonymous said...

Every time a certain creative would have a crit booked in with student teams we'd wait until he took the long walk to meet them in reception then wallpaper his office in porn, log his computer on to a farmyard fantasy site and litter the floor with tissues...

Was funny at the time but I'm beginning to feel guilty about the time 2 young girls had to sit through all that as mayonaise dripped off the ceiling.

Anonymous said...

I have heard of some funny ones.
A CD once repeatedly smashed a team's book up and down on a desk until it broke while telling them it was the biggest load of rubbish he'd ever seen. Another time he was looking at a girl's folio in a open-plan office, and angrily turned the pages till the end without saying a word. Then he looked her in the eyes and said 'Come into my office. I don't want you to cry in front of my staff.' He then proceeded to tear what was left of her confidence to shreds in the office. Full credit to her though- she did not shed a tear.

Anonymous said...

BRILLIANT 4.21.

Scamp, can we do a post on stories on the funny things the creatives have done during book crits?

Anonymous said...

Yes, great topic, but all the comments are from people getting the crit, what about from the other side?

I was working with my partner Pete up in Hall Advertising in Edinburgh. It was probably the best agency outside London at the time. Winning D&Ad's and Campaign awards most years.

This young art director came over from Glasgow with his book and we politely went through it till we reached an ad for the Scottish Census.

My partner recognised it as an he did but it looked different. "Aye well" said the glaswegian "I didnae think it looked serious enough" "That was the whole point" replied Pete,".. it was done like that so as not to scare people" Then Pete went off into a rant about how to do advertising and I could see the poor chap's eyes glazing over.

When Pete had finally finished he looked at both of us and with curled lip he said, "I didnae come here tae listen to all this stuff I came here for a job."

"Aye, well you better get back on that train to Glasgow because there's naethin' for you here."
Was the swift reply.

I wonder what he thought of the crit.

will atkinson said...

Hi Rodge,
How you doing. And why anon?

Anonymous said...

Because it's the most boring story anybody has ever written

James Cooper said...

Many moons ago my partner and I were interviewed by Axel at Howell Henry. He was brilliant, really nice guy.

We had a few meetings with him and then one was arranged with Steve Henry. Steve came in after about 15 minutes and said, 'We all really like your book. I just wanted to make sure you weren't cunts', and then walked off.

We didn't end up working there (our decision) but I remember quite respecting his honesty cos really as a CD that's what it's about rather than a book, which anyone could steal from D&AD etc.

Anonymous said...

i had my worst crit in hamburg, germany. the boss watched my book, said, he likes my work, and hired me. only to ignore me for 2 years. but stupid me needed those 2 years, to realize i was getting ditched... :-)