Friday, August 29, 2008

Who Is The Best ECD?

But first, the result of last week's poll.

Pleasingly, we are mostly happy. Only 20% of you either "don't like" or "hate" your current agency. So why do you whinge so much? Eh? Answer me that.


This week we're voting on who is the best ECD at a Top 30 Agency.

I've based the list on Campaign's most recent Top 30.

However, there's no one from TBWA or Delaney Lund in the poll - both have recently lost their ECD's and are yet to appoint a new one. I've also left out Ogilvy, since they have four creative partners and explicitly reject the ECD role.

In some cases, I may have put in the wrong people. Should I have added some of the 'Chairman' types like Gerry Moira and Mark Roalfe? Maybe. If I've badly muffed one or more of the choices, I apologise. Still, it should be interesting.

Vote now, in the right hand column of this blog.

And if you are making a comment, please bear in mind the house rules.

Previous poll results:
Who Do You Prefer To Date?
What's Better - Small Agency Or Big Agency?
Is It The Client Or The Agency Who Makes The Work Good?
Why Is Fallon's Print Not As Good As Their TV?
Is Dave Trott's Thinking Still Relevant?
Which Brand Would You Most LikeTo Work On?
What Do Scamp Readers Do For A Living?
What Time Do You Leave Work?
Does Juan Earn One Million Pounds A Year?
How Much Do You Earn?
What Do You Think Of Our Trade Rag?
Should A Creative Look Creative?
Ad Of The Year 2007
Do Difficult People Do The Best Work?
Who Is Responsible For Ineffectiveness?
Your Personal Success Record
Which Department Is The Most Insane?
What Music Do You Listen To While Working?
What Time Do You Get In?
Who Drinks The Most?
Press v Online
Success Or Glory?
Is Reading Blogs A Waste Of Time?
What's Your Job Satisfaction Level?
What's The Best Kind Of Festive Greeting?
Ad Of The Year 2006
What's Your Favourite Medium To Work In?
Agency Of The Year 2006
Which Department Is The Most Overpaid?

Thursday, August 28, 2008

How Neil French Got Into Advertising



Prestigious ad website ihaveanidea is launching a new regular feature called 'How D'You Get In?'

Twice a month, a Creative Director will share how he or she got into the business.

First up is the infamous Neil French, former WPP Worldwide Creative Director and founder of the World Press Awards.

I'm pretty sure that every word of what he has written is untrue, but it's highly entertaining stuff.

Although everything we've done makes us what we are today...for good or otherwise...I guess you'd like the precise moment when I had my first job in this racket.

Having been thrown out of an English Public School for decking the Deputy Headmaster, I got a job (via my long-suffering Dad's Masonic contacts) as a rent-collector in Birmingham. To describe this as miscasting is like saying that Buddha and Torquemada had a lot in common. They gave me the toughest areas, the red-light areas, and the immigrant ghettos. They also gave me a leather satchel and a German Shepherd, and some bus-fare.

Oddly-enough, I loved it. The people were really nice! The red-light area was an education in itself in so many ways; the Irish taught me how to fight dirty, drink Guinness, and operate betting-scams; and the Caribbean immigrants taught me to dance and smoke funny cigarettes.

The only snag was that I failed to collect any rents.

On my final day, I was widdled-on by an angry tenant, and chased up a high street by a large gentleman from Jamaica. The dog? It disappeared in the distance, never to be seen again. Dogs are smarter than they look, plainly.

On my arrival back at base, sans pooch and pouch, the boss called me into his office.
"You're not really cut out for this, are you?"
"No, Sir. Not really".
He leaned back in his chair and sighed.
"In my experience, anyone who's totally useless at everything else seems to go into advertising. I have a friend who owns an agency. Would you like me to make a call?"
"Yes, Sir. Please, Sir. That's jolly nice of you."

Ten minutes later, he called me back in and handed me a page torn out of the hitherto unsullied rent-book.
"There's the address. You have an appointment in an hour. Better hop on a bus right away, I think."
"Yes, Sir. Thank you, Sir. Goodbye, Sir."

By the time the door closed, I'm sure he'd forgotten me. But I got the job, and I owe that nice old bloke a huge debt.

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Tuesday, August 26, 2008

Is Paul Feldwick God?

It seems possible. First of all, he does have a beard. That’s a good start.

But more pertinently, there’s the god-like levels of insight.

This presentation of his totally rocked my socks.

Read the whole thing immediately, if not sooner.

Only if you have an urgent meeting in 3 minutes’ time should you read this paltry summary:

Feldwick’s basic thesis: “Ads must aim for the heart, not the head.”

Yes, we all know that. But Feldwick’s point is that we don’t act on it.

“We know brand preferences usually aren’t rational,” he says, “and yet we still persist in trying to put rational messages into our advertising.”

What’s the rational message in successful brand-building campaigns like the PG Tips monkeys, or ‘Whassup’? There isn’t one.

Let’s face it, even when there is information about the product, that information is not the sell.

For example, in the Rowan Atkinson Barclaycard ads, there was always product information. In the ‘Rug’ execution (“Aah. Smell those Tuareg campfires. Unmistakeable”) there was a rational product message about Barclaycard’s free insurance with purchase; but the ‘real sell’ is the “associations with a fashionable comedian, to sophisticated entertainment, to a contemporary style of humour and to the good feelings that you have when you watch that commercial. One result of that was a significant growth in numbers of younger cardholders for example.”

The lovely thing about Feldwick’s point-of-view is that he leads us straight back to Bill Bernbach – that the success of an advertisement is dependent on creativity, emotion and execution; not logic, strategy and message.

“Suppose”, Bill Bernbach wrote, "Winston Churchill had said 'we owe a lot to the RAF' instead of 'never was so much owed by so many so few', do you think the impact would have been the same?"

Feldwick locates success in “the visual, visceral power of the entire advertisement; its colour, movement, music, timing and every detail.”

I just have one ‘build’ to Feldwick’s approach. I wonder whether the product information – as well as giving the creative team a useful starter – might be necessary as a ‘justifier’? Just like you can’t eat two spoonfuls of honey without a slice of wholemeal toast underneath to justify it, maybe the Barclaycard consumer needs the rational ‘purchase insurance’ message to feel that the rug-based entertainment is justified. I don’t know.

Anyway, Planners needn’t fret. We’ll still need a brief. But it should talk about the desired associations, rather than any information to be communicated. For example, the brief for ‘Whassup’ might have read “Associate Budweiser with feelings of sociability.”

But no more briefs about hops and barley and shit. For real.

Friday, August 22, 2008

Happiness Poll

But first, here's the result of the controversy-causing Sauce Poll.


While I respect other people's dating choices, I personally would never go out with a civilian. I mean, when you tell them over dinner how "the Client is trying to ruin their own ad by insisting on putting more and more information into it", they wouldn't give a shit.

I also had a bad experience going out with another Creative once. It just got a bit... competitive.

So my healthy dating recommend would be for someone in a 'related but different' field like Planning, Account Handling or TV. When you have a bad day, they can empathise. And they will never write a better ad than you, because they don't write any.

This week's Poll is about happiness.

Obviously you're delighted with your career choice. But how happy are you with your employer? Is going to work like a daily stint in Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory? Or a salt mine south-east of Yakutsk?

Vote now, in the right hand column of this blog.

Previous poll results:
What's Better - Small Agency Or Big Agency?
Is It The Client Or The Agency Who Makes The Work Good?
Why Is Fallon's Print Not As Good As Their TV?
Is Dave Trott's Thinking Still Relevant?
Which Brand Would You Most LikeTo Work On?
What Do Scamp Readers Do For A Living?
What Time Do You Leave Work?
Does Juan Earn One Million Pounds A Year?
How Much Do You Earn?
What Do You Think Of Our Trade Rag?
Should A Creative Look Creative?
Ad Of The Year 2007
Do Difficult People Do The Best Work?
Who Is Responsible For Ineffectiveness?
Your Personal Success Record
Which Department Is The Most Insane?
What Music Do You Listen To While Working?
What Time Do You Get In?
Who Drinks The Most?
Press v Online
Success Or Glory?
Is Reading Blogs A Waste Of Time?
What's Your Job Satisfaction Level?
What's The Best Kind Of Festive Greeting?
Ad Of The Year 2006
What's Your Favourite Medium To Work In?
Agency Of The Year 2006
Which Department Is The Most Overpaid?

Wednesday, August 20, 2008

Rivals Reunited

Watford is guilty of producing more advertising Creatives than any other college in the UK.

Judging from these line-ups, numerous offences against Fashion and Hairstyling must also be taken into consideration.

Link courtesy of Kim

Tuesday, August 19, 2008

Tuesday Tip No.59 - How To Freelance

Someone calling themselves 'Inky Blackstuff' posted this the other day in the comments section. But it's a wonderful piece of writing, that I think deserves a wider audience, and a permanent place in the roll-call of Tips.

How To Freelance, by Inky Blackstuff

Thanks to the wonderful credit crunch, many of you are about to become freelancers (ie fired). I have freelanced before (and am likely to be doing so again) so allow me to enlighten you as to what to expect.

1) When you invoice, don't expect to be paid. Ever. Freelancers are different to normal people and they do not need to eat, pay their mortgages or buy trousers, thus no need to pay them.

2) You are like novice Spitfire pilots ie it is unlikely that you'll last long so no one will bother to get to know you or even acknowledge you in the corridor.

3) Freelancers are unlike normal people and will automatically know where the printer is. Though, of course, your computer won't be networked to it. It will take IT three days to attach you to a printer named after a celebrity. Freelancers are unlike normal people, they don't need to print anything.

5) If you bring your own laptop it will be impossible to get it to attach to the agency's network. Even though three IT bods are at your desk staring at it and saying "server" a lot. They will however admire it because, for tax reasons, you can buy a bloody nice one. IT will explain how to print something in colour but the method will be so fiendishly complicated and the IT bod will explain it so quickly you will give up, download your colour printing onto a USB drive and print the fuckers up at home.

5(b) The briefs you are given are often the most difficult ones in the agency. They will have been attempted, multiple times, over an entire year by every creative/planner/desperate account man in the building and will have remained resolutely uncracked, the creative director will have given up on them and you will be reviewing with the head planner (who, by this stage, has been driven quite, quite mad), you will be informed that the client will leave if you don't crack it in the next three days. Despite these hurdles, you won't be given a computer until the last day and you will be given seat in the coffee bar area. Freelancers are different to normal people. The more obstacles to creativity you can give them on really difficult projects, the easier they find it.

6) Other people think you are paid a fortune. Ostensibly you are paid quite well but of course rule 1) applies. They don't actually give you money until you threaten to firebomb the finance department. And even then they don't pay you, they just don the asbestos suits they keep under their desks. They automatically lose your first invoice. This goes without saying (I always used to send a second invoice two weeks after the first). You send it again, then they ask you what you were working on. Then they'll be on holiday or leave for another job, finally after 6 months you'll get your money but inflation will by now have made it worthless.

7) If you ask a PA for a pad or a pencil they will look at you as if you are mad. Don't know why. The stationary cupboard (in reality a drawer in a knackerd cupboard, covered in little magic marker marks, that refuses to open) will not have any pads (bar thousands of the tracing paper ones that no one ever uses) and you will have to steal a pen from the creative director's PA's desk when she's at lunch.

8) No one will tell you about the security system and you will get trapped in a stairwell. For some reason people assume freelancers are different from normal people and every security number in every agency is etched into their DNA or they have already received their security passes by magic or something.

9) When you get there on your first day, the person who got you in will have carefully omitted to tell anyone about your impending arrival. He will also be out at a meeting all morning so that you will have lost an entire half day of the three you have been allotted to crack this uncrackable brief.

10) You won't crack the brief. Frankly by the time you are involved the client is going to walk whether you give him a solution or not.

11) People will be utterly gobsmacked if you do anything good. Freelancers are not like normal people, they're shit at advertising.

12) There will be glorious weekdays when you are not at work, the sun is out and you have nothing to do and all day to do it in. You will learn what kind of people inhabit the world while normal people are at work. They're freaks and nutters.

13) The biggest cheese in the agency will pay you a visit and be very friendly. He is desperate for you to crack this brief and keep this client's income. His bonus depends on you.

14) All agencies are the same only the clients' creative judgement (or lack of) makes the difference.

15) You will occasionally work at some agencies that treat freelancers like normal people. Some good (though with their own...errrm how can I put it...peculiarities) ones are BBH, DDB, WCRS etc. Politeness, a public school education and sheer naked greed (and perhaps the need of employment in the future) forbids me mentioning other, though wonderful, less enlightened places.


Does this tally with your experience of freelancing? Let us know.

Craft: How To Know If You've Had An Idea; How To Use Social Media; What Would John Webster Do?; What Would Paul & Nigel Do?; The Hidden Flaw; How To Write Copy; Be Funny All The Way Through; How To Do Virals; How To Write Headlines; How To Do Direct; How To Do Radio; How To Do Press; How To Do TV; How To Do Digital; How To Do Posters; Read Iain's Tips; Be Very; Never-Seen-Before Footage; Dicketts' Finger; Two Blokes In The Pub; Play Family Fortunes; Don't Overpolish

Guile: Beat The Finger; How To Get The Best Out Of Directors; Don't Write Ads, Write Strategies; How To Choose Where To Work; Working Outside London; How To Negotiate Your Salary; How To Get A Pay Rise; Be Wary Of Punding; Challenge The Brief; Tell The Truth; Playing To Lose; Look At Weird Shit; Why You Shouldn't Present To The Client; How To Present To Clients If You Have To; Presenting To The Team; Presenting To The Creative Director; How To Deal With Rejection; Look Creative; Don't Be Afraid To Ask; Your Idea Has To Be 120%; Don't Behave; How To Discuss Ideas; Read Hugh's Tips; How To Get A Job In Advertising Part IV - How To Turn A Placement Into A Job; How To Turn A Placement Into A Job (Ed Morris view); How To Get A Job In Advertising Part III - How To Approach Agencies (re-print of Tip No. 7); How To Get A Job In Advertising Part II - How To Put A Book Together; How To Get A Job In Advertising Part I - FAQ; Make Friends With Traffic; Get Reference; Don't Stop Too Soon; Breaking Up; Working Well With Your Partner; Finding The Right Partner; How To Approach Agencies; Should You Take A Bad Job?

Monday, August 18, 2008

Lowe Resigns Stella

This is big news. It's even attracted comments on Brand Republic.

My favourite Stella ad? Many to choose from. But it's probably Pilot.



I'm just a guy, and I love a good war film. And this is virtually a whole war film, condensed into 90 seconds (or whatever time-length you watch it in).

Awesome direction by Ivan Zacharias; every single shot moves the story forward.

A great baddie - he brings the plane down himself, with a rifle.

And the end gag, when the German soldier drinks the Stella and says 'Allez' in a French accent... now that's clever. Way too clever for your average Stella drinker, probably. Which maybe brings us back to the beginning of the story.

Sunday, August 17, 2008

House Rules

Today I’m laying down a proper set of House Rules for commenting.

Why do we need these rules, when no other ad blog has them?

Well, for some reason, Scamp gets more comments than all the other Top 25 ad blogs put together. These comments need marshalling.

Then there’s the brouhaha that was reported in The Guardian, The Huffington Post, and even Finland, apparently.

Whatever your (and my) views on free speech, offensiveness, context, and intention, for as long as Scamp is hosted by Blogger, we have to follow their rules.

As readers have pointed out, it’s about time the comments policy was tightened up anyway.

I’m going to continue to allow anonymous commenting. The knowledge that you can speak freely is what gives the comments section its pop.

However, I would ask you to please respect these…

House Rules

Do not post messages that are unlawful, harassing, defamatory, or abusive. Do not post Hate Speech, which Wikipedia defines as "comments intended to degrade, intimidate, or incite violence or prejudicial action against a person or group of people based on their race, gender, age, ethnicity, nationality, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, language ability, moral or political views, socioeconomic class, occupation or appearance."

No spamming or flooding. Don't repost the same message, or very similar messages, more than once.

Relevance. Interesting posts that are off the current topic are acceptable. When that happens, I'll try to start another thread, and move the comments over. However, banal or repetitive off-topic posts lower the value of the conversation for everyone and may be removed.

No impersonating. Impersonating someone is not acceptable.

Links. Do not post stupid random links.

Criticism.No personal attacks of any kind are allowed. Criticism of work is very much allowed, indeed is one of the cornerstones of this blog. However, criticism by anonymous commenters must be either very constructive or very amusing. Comments may be edited for publication.

Copyright and the law You own the copyright in your postings, but you also agree to grant to Simon Veksner a perpetual, royalty-free, non-exclusive, sublicenseable right and license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform, play, and exercise all copyright and publicity rights with respect to any such work worldwide and/or to incorporate it in other works in any media now known or later developed for the full term of any rights that may exist in such content. In other words, if you post a good comment, I may use it in my book. If you do not wish to grant such rights, do not post to this site. You may not violate, plagiarise, or infringe on the rights of third parties including copyright, trademark, trade secret, privacy, personal, publicity, or proprietary rights. Phew.

So, basically, behave. You’ve been told.

Friday, August 15, 2008

Props

A few days ago, we mocked HSBC. The bank, that is. But you can't fault their advertising.

Their global campaign is not only relevant, thought-provoking, simple and supports gazillions of executions... but it even has a clever media strategy behind it - owning the jet-bridge.

So, props to a campaign that I don't think gets enough.









Thursday, August 14, 2008

The Shop With The Literal Name


Main Street, Westport, Connecticut.

In another store today, I almost collided with a member of staff in the aisle - they said "hello" and I said "sorry". That just about sums up the difference between our two nations, I think. Along with the shop sign.

Tuesday, August 12, 2008

New York Wall

The 'Meat Packing District', Manhattan

I've always been a fan of graffiti. But you don't actually see much in NYC any more. That may be because the Mayor's office now calls it "Graffiti vandalism" and offers a $500 reward for information leading to the arrest of anyone responsible, according to a notice I saw in the back of a cab. *Sigh*. New York was so much more fun when it was dangerous. Unless you got murdered, I suppose.

P.S. As you may have noticed I am now back after what the Americans call an 'outage'. Google suspended Scamp after someone complained about a comment in the Sauce Poll post a few days ago. Details are there if you're interested.

Friday, August 08, 2008

Topical


The West Village, Manhattan

Bit studenty, this campaign?

Thursday, August 07, 2008

Introducing Moggy

Carl Moggridge is a Brighton-born Strategist now working in Sydney, and whose blog has some fun and quirky stuff on it.

I particularly liked this post entitled "The World's Local Bank My Arse," in which he gives a textbook example of customer experience undermining a brand proposition:

There is me thinking that I could quite easily open a bank account with HSBC in Australia seeing as I have been a customer with them for 12 years in the UK. No they tell me it isn’t that easy because we are on ‘different systems’

Talking of abroad, I'm off to the States for a week; I hope to post an interesting U.S. ad or bit of typography each day, from my phone.

But don't think you can start with the bad language just because I'm away. BBH hat-trick hero and Scamp assistant Al Merry will be looking after comments.

Byeeeeee x

Wednesday, August 06, 2008

Essex, Drugs & Rock 'n' Roll



I've never met him, but I love the sound of Jonathan Durden - the 'D' in media giant PHD.

He once spent 18 days in the Big Brother house, had his drink and drug problems chronicled by the tabloids, and sold himself as an escort “for the hell of it”. And his life has been touched by tragedy.

Now he's written a novel, which contains a lot of fun material, but he apparently confessed to writing it in a month, which sorta shows.

Sample sentence: "He had hugged her with gratitude, since dealing with medical emergencies (along with cleaning up bodily fluids) filled him with an urgent desire to rush to the nearest airport and book a one-way flight to Gdansk, Bolivia or Alaska."

Not terrible, but Nabokov's position is safe.

I just wish he'd written "Alaska, Peru or Gdansk." In a list of three, you don't have two place-names ending in 'a'. And it's so much better to end on a stressed syllable.

Whoops.

Tuesday, August 05, 2008

Tuesday Tip No.58 - Beat The Finger


Your enemy

If you are a junior team looking for a job, your biggest enemy is the Creative Director's finger.

When he is looking at your book, if his brain doesn't very quickly understand an idea, his finger will flip to the next page. And your creative brilliance will be lost.

The sad fact is that when he's looking at books, a Creative Director's finger works faster than his brain.

He's short of time, and has a lot of other things on his mind. He hasn't got the time or patience to decode ads that are hard to decode. And actually that's not a bad thing. He doesn't want to hire teams who write ads that the public will find hard to decode.

But if you want him to hire you, you need to beat the finger. You need to do everything you can to make sure that your idea has been understood before his finger flips to the next page. (Or in the case of a digital portfolio, clicks).

If his brain hesitates or is confused, his finger will activate.

Here's 10 suggestions to stop that happening:

1) Be arresting. A book isn't real life. In real life it may be worth doing a long copy ad for cross-tracks. In your book it isn't.

2) Leave out all extraneous stuff like what the brief was, what student awards this ad won. They just slow down the communication.

3) Leave space between each campaign. Like a blank page. Don't have him thinking for even 1/10 of a second that the first ad in your campaign for lawnmowers is another ad in your campaign for a chocolate bar. This will only confuse.

4) All drawings must be crystal clear. It doesn't matter if they're hand-drawn or mac'd up, all that matters is they're quick to understand. If a CD pauses, it should be because he's stunned by the brilliance of your strategy. Not because he's trying to work out whether your drawing is a dog, a cat, or a car.

5) Dialogue that accompanies TV scripts. It just looks like it will take a lot of time to read. Maybe you come upon a CD with time on his hands, and he reads it, and loves it. Maybe you don't, and he just flips. Why risk it?

6) Logos. Use the brands' real logos. Why? Because they're marginally quicker to take in than hand-drawn ones.

7) Got ambient work in your book (I hope you do)? If it's not abundantly clear that it's an ambient ad, then don't be afraid to write 'AMBIENT' in big letters at the top. A few fractions of a second in which the CD is trying to work out whether a picture in front of him is for a print ad or an ambient ad are a few fractions of a second too many.

8) That's all I've got. It was shorter than 10. Make your book flow as quickly and smoothly as possible. That finger flips fast. Make sure your ideas are faster.


Previous Tips:

How To Know If You've Had An Idea; How To Use Social Media; How To Get The Best Out Of Directors; Don't Write Ads, Write Strategies; How To Choose Where To Work; Working Outside London; What Would John Webster Do?; What Would Paul & Nigel Do?; The Hidden Flaw; How To Write Copy; Be Funny All The Way Through; How To Do Virals; How To Negotiate Your Salary; How To Get A Pay Rise; Be Wary Of Punding; Challenge The Brief; Tell The Truth; Playing To Lose; How To Write Headlines; How To Do Direct; How To Do Radio; How To Do Press; How To Do TV; How To Do Digital; How To Do Posters; Look At Weird Shit; Why You Shouldn't Present To The Client; How To Present To Clients If You Have To; Presenting To The Team; Presenting To The Creative Director; How To Deal With Rejection; Look Creative; Don't Be Afraid To Ask; Your Idea Has To Be 120%; Read Iain's Tips; Don't Behave; How To Discuss Ideas; Read Hugh's Tips; How To Get A Job In Advertising Part IV - How To Turn A Placement Into A Job; How To Turn A Placement Into A Job (Ed Morris view); How To Get A Job In Advertising Part III - How To Approach Agencies (re-print of Tip No. 7); How To Get A Job In Advertising Part II - How To Put A Book Together; How To Get A Job In Advertising Part I - FAQ; Make Friends With Traffic; Get Reference; Don't Stop Too Soon; Be Very; Breaking Up; Working Well With Your Partner; Finding The Right Partner; How To Approach Agencies; Never-Seen-Before Footage; Dicketts' Finger; Two Blokes In The Pub; Play Family Fortunes; Should You Take A Bad Job?; Don't Overpolish

Monday, August 04, 2008

Goodbye Ben

As many of you will know, Ben of Lunar BBDO announced he has ceased blogging.

Maybe it's a tad navel-gazey for an ad blogger to write about the comings and going of another ad blogger.

But over the last few months, Ben's has been the best ad blog out there. Only fair to mark its passing.

And it's worth laying to rest some of the rumours floating around. I had a cup of tea with Ben yesterday and he explained he had NOT come under any pressure from BBDO or from his partner Daryl or anyone at Lunar about the blog. He just has a couple of other projects that he wants to put his time into instead. All the best with those, Ben.

Friday, August 01, 2008

Sauce Poll

Here's the result of last week's poll:

Bit surprised about the downer you all have on big agencies. Is it just that the word big means bad? Personally I like big agencies. The photocopiers usually work, and there's plenty of different accounts to have a go at. Medium-sized I like too. Not keen on the small Agency. If you don't get on with someone, it's a problem - you're around them the whole time. Whereas in bigger places you can easily seek out folk you like and not see ones you don't.

As it's Summer, this week's poll is even more frivolous than usual.

I'm asking: Who do you most prefer to date? A supposedly complicated Creative type? Or does the intellectual cut-and-thrust of a relationship with a Planner suit you best? Perhaps the people skills and expense account of a Suit works for you. Or do you find the organisational skills + short skirts in a TV dept. the ideal combo?

Vote now, in the right hand column of this blog.

Previous poll results:
Is It The Client Or The Agency Who Makes The Work Good?
Why Is Fallon's Print Not As Good As Their TV?
Is Dave Trott's Thinking Still Relevant?
Which Brand Would You Most LikeTo Work On?
What Do Scamp Readers Do For A Living?
What Time Do You Leave Work?
Does Juan Earn One Million Pounds A Year?
How Much Do You Earn?
What Do You Think Of Our Trade Rag?
Should A Creative Look Creative?
Ad Of The Year 2007
Do Difficult People Do The Best Work?
Who Is Responsible For Ineffectiveness?
Your Personal Success Record
Which Department Is The Most Insane?
What Music Do You Listen To While Working?
What Time Do You Get In?
Who Drinks The Most?
Press v Online
Success Or Glory?
Is Reading Blogs A Waste Of Time?
What's Your Job Satisfaction Level?
What's The Best Kind Of Festive Greeting?
Ad Of The Year 2006
What's Your Favourite Medium To Work In?
Agency Of The Year 2006
Which Department Is The Most Overpaid?

Fallon Officially Second Best

Last night at the Paddington Recreation Ground, a little football match took place. Which BBH won 5-3. Including a hat-trick from Scamp assistant Al Merry.

BBH rules and Fallon are all losers!! (Unless they offer me a job. In which case, I didn't mean that.)